Letter to Congress: Equity Amendments for a Fair 2013 Farm Bill

This Letter is sent on Behalf of the Undersigned Groups. For more information contact Lorette Picciano, Rural Coalition at lpicciano@ruralco.org or 202-628-7160; Katherine Ozer, National Family Farm Coalition at kozer@nffc.net or 202-543-5675; Y. Armando Nieto, Community Food and Justice Coalition at yanieto@cafoodjustice.org or 510-547-1547

 
May 23, 2013

Dear Senator,

As the Senate considers the Farm Bill on the Senate floor, we write to express our support for passage of a full and fair 2013 Farm Bill that will increase economic opportunity for the nation’s diverse family farmers, farmworkers, rural and urban communities, and Indian Tribes; protect the environment; and ensure proper nutrition for all families and communities.

We, the undersigned organizations, have recommendations for the farm bill that extend beyond the specific issues in this letter, but we focus here on equity considerations. We support a full and fair package that balances any reductions across all areas of the Farm Bill; mitigates disasters especially for the most vulnerable producers; protects natural resources; enhances equity and inclusion; constructs a new and economically viable future for agriculture and rural communities; and assures healthy food for all consumers.

As written the bill under debate, S. 954 saves $24.2 billion. The Committee originally committed to saving $23 billion. Two of the amendments (#1055 and #1088) listed below would direct $210 million of the additional and unexpected savings to the programs listed below. The total savings for the bill would still exceed $24 billion and these amendments would make a small but significant investment in our diverse producers, new generation farmers, and the growing food systems in rural and urban communities across our country.

We ask you to co-sponsor and vote for the following still-pending amendments to restore funding for critical programs charged with serving chronically underserved segments of agriculture and the food system, and make additional policy changes to improve rural development, local food systems, urban agriculture including programs serving Indian Tribes, socially disadvantaged, beginning and veteran producers and farmworkers while assuring healthy food for all.

We urge Senators to SUPPORT the following priority amendments:

Udall (NM) – Heinrich (NM) (#1055) Socially Disadvantaged and Veteran Producer Training –SUPPORT
The Outreach and Assistance Program for Socially Disadvantaged Farmers and Ranchers and Veteran Farmers and Rancher (also known as the 2501 Program) is a historic program that provides competitive grants to educational institutions, Extension, and community-based organizations to assist African- American, American-Indian, Asian-American and Latino farmers and ranchers in owning and operating farms and participating in USDA programs. The committee-passed bill expands program eligibility requirements to include veteran farmers and ranchers and funds this program at $10 million annually, about half of previous funding. The amendment would restore funding of $17 million annually in order to serve both the traditional and new producers now eligible for the program.

• Udall (NM) – Heinrich (NM) (#1045) Receipt for Service – SUPPORT
This amendment adds authority to require the issuance of a receipt for service or denial of service to any current or prospective participant in USDA programs serving farmers and ranchers as operated by the Farm Service Agency, the Natural Resources and Conservation Service and in any other USDA program directly serving producers. In a time of tight resources, a receipt for service will help assure that all farmers and ranchers receive clear information on programs available to them and what they need to do to access them, and verify that information has been provided.

• Udall (NM) – Heinrich (NM) (# 1048) EQIP Community Irrigation Association Language –SUPPORT
The amendment defines eligible community irrigation associations and would allow USDA to make alternate payment arrangements so members of irrigation associations including acequias could receive support for conservation practices through their association so long as the payment limit for any individual producers in the association is not exceeded. This would allow NRCS to do a single contract for an irrigation-wide community project rather than a series of individual producer contracts for the same project.

• Udall (NM) – Heinrich (NM) (# 1049) EQIP Irrigation Water Saving – SUPPORT
This amendment would strengthen in the requirements Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) to assure producers who use EQIP funds for irrigation not only to improve their irrigation systems but also to achieve true water savings. This would ensure that USDA payments for irrigation efficiency also generate water conservation benefits, such as enhanced in-stream flow and water storage.

• (Seeking Sponsor) Expansion of the Substantially Underserved Trust Area Initiative with USDA Rural Development – SUPPORT
This amendment expands the Substantially Underserved Trust Area (SUTA) Initiative in USDA Rural Development Rural Utilities Service to all programs under Rural Development. The amendment will improve access to family housing and community facilities financing and business and economic development funding, providing RD with added flexibility to invest in individuals, businesses and organizations developing private sector jobs and local economies in rural trust land communities.

• Brown (OH) – Tester (MT) – Heinrich (NM) – Schatz (HI) – Gillibrand (NY) – Reed(RI) – Wyden (OR) – Cowan (MA) (#1088) To Encourage Food And Agriculture Market Development, Entrepreneurship, And Education – SUPPORT
This comprehensive amendment provides much-needed funding and a few important technical policy changes to a handful of key programs that support development of a more resilient food system. These changes and the funding the amendment provides make strides towards aligning our agriculture, health, and economic policy in ways that ensure farmers get a fair price for their product, all Americans have access to affordable, healthy food, and that both contribute to strong communities and a thriving economy. The amendment increases mandatory funding in the Community Food Program from $5 million to $10 million per year, in the Food and Agriculture Service Learning Program to $15 million in mandatory funding over the life of the farm bill, and in the Value-Added Producer Grants Program from $12.5 million to $20 million per year, in the Farmers Market and Local Food Promotion Program from $20 million to $30 million per year and in the Senior Farmers Market Nutrition Program from $20.6 million to $23.1 million in FY2014 and to $25.6 million per year in FY2015 – FY2018. In the Business and Industry Loan Program it modifies the existing set-aside for loans for local food enterprises to eliminate a burdensome third party labeling requirement, to clarify that project priorities include creating new market opportunities for farmers, increasing good food access in underserved communities, and supporting comprehensive regional economic development strategies, and to provide flexibility for USDA to reduce barriers to participation.

• Casey (PA) – Harkin (IA) (#986) Microloans – SUPPORT
The amendment would authorize micro-lending opportunities within the Department of Agriculture by creating a new simplified loan category within the Farm Service Agency’s direct operating loan portfolio. If adopted, this provision would authorize USDA’s Farm Service Agency to make small loans up to $35,000. The new loan program would be funded out of the existing direct operating loan portfolio, and would streamline the application process to facilitate participation. This amendment would also give FSA discretionary authority to establish a cooperative lending program to allow USDAselected intermediaries (such as non-governmental or community-based organizations, state departments of agriculture, and economic development councils) to make microloans to eligible borrowers.

• Tester (MT) Public Breeding for Food Security- SUPPORT
Farmer access to seeds and breeds adapted to their regions and specific farming and market needs is paramount to fostering the competitiveness of agriculture and ensuring future national food security. This amendment would designate conventional breeding for public cultivar and breed development as a high priority research area within the Department of Agriculture. The amendment would also remove hurdles that have hindered USDA’s efforts to address this need, including establishing a unified definition to ensure public breeding research is being funded through USDA.

• Leahy (VT) – Collins (ME) EQIP Organic Initiative Payment Limit Elimination – SUPPORT
This amendment eliminates the separate payment limit for farmers participating in the EQIP Organic Initiative so that all farmers are subject to the same payment limitations in EQIP.

• Grassley (IA) and Brown (OH) (#969) Special Counsel for Livestock Competition – SUPPORT
This amendment establishes an Office of Competition and Fair Practices headed by a Special Counsel for Competition Matters for the purpose of investigating and prosecuting violations under the Packers and Stockyards Act and coordinating antitrust enforcement between the U.S. Department of Justice, Federal Trade Commission, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). Agriculture is one of the most consolidated sectors in the U.S. economy, but the federal antitrust and competition oversight of the food and agriculture sector is fragmented, with uncoordinated oversight shared among USDA, the U.S. Department of Justice and the Federal Trade Commission. The lack of coherent jurisdiction is further complicated by the increasing vertical integration in the sector, where some firms and combinations of firms require monitoring by more than one agency. The Grassley amendment creates a USDA special counsel on agricultural competition to coordinate and oversee competition and antitrust enforcement activities among the federal agencies.

• Rockefeller (WV) – Tester (MT) and Johnson (D-SD), Prohibiting Retaliation Against Farmers Who Speak Up – SUPPORT
It has become common for livestock and poultry companies to retaliate against contract farmers who speak up about abusive contracting practices. The amendment clarifies that it is a clear violation of the Packers and Stockyards Act for companies to retaliate against farmers for exercising their legal rights, such as talking to federal agency officials or members of Congress about their farming operations and contracts. It would prohibits meatpackers from taking any kind of retaliatory action against livestock producers who speak out and would put an end to the ongoing actions by meatpackers who retaliate against producers who complain to federal agencies and to their members of Congress.

• Tester (MT) (#971) Requiring An Annual USDA Report On Concentration In the Agriculture And Food Industries – SUPPORT
Despite the dramatic concentration of the agriculture and food sectors, USDA lacks comprehensive, sector-wide and timely information about the overall state of competitiveness in the agriculture and food sector from seed to supermarket. The Tester amendment requires USDA to collect information on the consolidation levels throughout the food and farm sector and issue an annual report to the House and Senate Agriculture Committees that includes statistics relating to the four largest firms in agriculture markets.

• Enzi (WY) – Johnson (SD) (#982) Livestock Marketing – SUPPORT
A large portion of cattle are sold through formula contracts and marketing agreements are negotiated in secret, which gives packers all the information and market power and forces livestock producers to accept “formula” prices that are finalized on delivery instead of firm, base prices when the contracts are signed. The Enzi amendment prohibits the use of anti-competitive forward contracts, otherwise known as un-priced formula contracts and requires all marketing arrangements to use firm, fixed base prices for marketing arrangements to ensure that cattle producers are fairly paid for their livestock. This amendment is absolutely critical as it will immediately stop the packers from accumulating large volumes of un-priced captives supply livestock, which they use to drive down the cash market.

• Boxer (CA) (#1026) GE Labeling Amendment – SUPPORT
This amendment expresses the sense of the Senate that the United States should join 64 other nations in giving their consumers the right to know whether there are genetically engineered ingredients in their food. At least 93 percent of Americans want to know whether there are GE ingredients in their food, regardless of race, income, education, or party affiliation and 26 states are moving to require GE labeling.

• Merkley (OR) – Tester (MT) – Blumenthal (CT) – Begich (AK) – Heinrich (NM) – Boxer (CA)(#978) – Repeal of Biotechnology Rider in the Continuing Resolution – SUPPORT
The Continuing Resolution passed by Congress earlier this year contained a provision that strips federal courts of the authority to halt the sale or planting of biotechnology products that have not been adequately reviewed for their economic and environmental impacts. This amendment would strike that harmful provision.

• Coburn (OK) – Durbin (IL) – McCain (AZ) (#999) Limit crop insurance subsidies for wealthiest farmers – SUPPORT
This amendment would reduce the level of federal premium support for crop insurance participants with an Adjusted Gross Income (AGI) over $750,000 by 15 percentage points for all buy-up policies beyond catastrophic coverage. The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) estimates this amendment, which affects less than 1 percent of farmers, would save more than $1.2 billion dollars over ten years. Furthermore, we support any amendment that would extend the premium reductions and waivers for supplied in crop insurance to beginning and limited resource farmers and ranchers to socially disadvantaged farmers and ranchers. All three groups are provided premium reductions in the NAP (Non Insured Disaster Assistance Program) in the Miscellaneous Title.

We urge Senators to OPPOSE the following amendments:

• Roberts (KS) – The following amendments reduce SNAP funding:

• Roberts (#949)To eliminate the low-income home energy assistance from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program – OPPOSE
This amendment eliminates the SNAP ‘Heat and Eat’ Program by reducing benefits to those who also receive energy assistance.

• Roberts (#950)To eliminate duplicative employment and training programs from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program – OPPOSE
This amendment eliminates the SNAP employment and training program.

• Sessions (AL) – Both of the following amendments reduce SNAP funding:

• Sessions (#946) — To terminate the current Partnership for Nutrition Assistance Initiative between the United States and Mexico – OPPOSE
This amendment terminates the current Partnership for Nutrition Assistance Initiative between the U.S. and Mexico. This Partnership, established by the Bush Administration, helps low-income, legal immigrant (often citizen) children access food, allowing them to be healthier, better educated children with brighter futures.

• Sessions (#947)— To require the use of the systematic alien verification for entitlements program in the administration of the supplemental nutrition assistance program – OPPOSE
This amendment requires all members of a household applying for SNAP to provide documentation of citizenship or immigration status. If each household member could not meet the documentation requirements, then the entire household would be ineligible. Currently, states may not deny SNAP to eligible individuals based on the status of other family members who are not seeking services. Research shows that this new requirement would adversely impact senior citizens, especially African Americans, who live in rural areas because they do not have a birth certificate. Some may have never been issued a birth certificate because their birth was not officially registered – in some cases due to racial discrimination in hospitals, or poverty which prevented access to hospital care. Imposing these new requirements would create enormous administrative hurdles for the most vulnerable, delay benefits for needy households who must seek original birth certificates, and terminate benefits to individuals who cannot access such documentation.

• Thune (SD) (#991) Cuts to SNAP Education – OPPOSE
Would cut SNAP Nutrition Education by $2.1 billion by reducing state’s funding to $5 per SNAP participant.

We are continuing to review more amendments as information becomes available and will forward any additional recommendations that will also benefit these communities and we have also attached an earlier letter signed by more than 130 groups affirming the priorities reflected here.

As you move to complete action on this important bill, we urge you to make all funding and policy recommendations relative to farm bill programs with an eye toward the future: concern for the next generations of our nation’s farmers and ranchers; healthy and nutritious for food for all; and inclusivity of all women, minority, tribal, and limited resource farmers, farmworkers, and communities who are often in greatest need of these important programs.

Sincerely,
Agricultural Missions, Inc., New York, NY
Alabama State Association of Cooperatives, Forkland, AL
Alianza Nacional de Campesinas, Oxnard, CA
American Indian’s Truths – WPFW 89.3 FM – Pacifica Radio, Washington, DC
Arkansas Land and Farm Development Corporation, Brinkley, AK
Ashtabula, Geauga, Lake Counties Farmers Union, Windsor, OH
Atlantic States Legal Foundation, Inc., Syracuse, NY
Atrisco Land Grant, Albuquerque, NM
BioRegional Strategies, Albuquerque, NM
Canjilon Grazing Allotment, Canjilon, NM
Center for Social Inclusion, New York, NY
Colorado Hispanic Ranchers & Farmers, Antonito, CO
ColorOfChange.org, Oakland, CA
Community Food and Justice Coalition, Oakland, CA
Community to Community, Bellingham, WA
Delaware Local Food Exchange, Wilmington, DE
Fair World Project, Portland, OR
Farm to Table, Santa Fe, NM
FarmBillPrimer.org, Baltimore, MD
Farmworker Association of Florida, Apopka, FL
Federation of Southern Cooperatives Rural Training and Research Center, Epes, AL
Federation of Southern Cooperatives, East Point, GA
Fernandez Ranch, Centerville, WA
Food & Water Watch, Washington, DC
Food Chain Workers Alliance, Los Angeles, CA
Grassroots International, Boston, MA
Hispanic Organizations Leadership Alliance (HOLA), Washington, DC
Hunger Action Network of New York, Albany, NY
Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy, Minneapolis, MN
Intertribal Agriculture Council, Billings, MT
Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future, Baltimore, MD
Kentucky Resources Council, Inc., Frankfort, KY
La Merced del Pueblo de Chilili, Chilili, NM
La Plazita Farm, Albuquerque, NM
League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC), Hereford, TX
Lennon Ranch, Lookout, CA
Live Real, Oakland, CA
Maine Rural Partners, Orono, ME
Minnesota Food Association, Marine on St Croix, MN
Mississippi Association of Cooperatives, Jackson, MS
Morning Star Farm of Taos, Arroyo Seco, NM
National Dignity Campaign, San Francisco, CA
National Family Farm Coalition, Washington, DC
National Hmong American Farmers, Inc., Fresno, CA
National Latino Farmers and Ranchers Trade Association, Washington, DC
National Women In Agriculture Association, Oklahoma City, OK
New England Small Farm Institute, Belchertown, MA
New Mexico Acequia Association, Santa Fe, NM
New Mexico Food and Agriculture Policy Council, Santa Fe, NM
North Carolina Association of Black Lawyers Land Loss Prevention Project, Durham, NC
Northeast Organic Dairy Producers Alliance, Deerfield, MA
Northeast Sustainable Agriculture Working Group (NESAWG), New Paltz, NY
Northern New Mexico Stockman’s Association, Taos, NM
Northwest Forest Worker Center, Albany, CA
Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association, Columbus, OH
Oklahoma Black Historical Research Project Inc., Oklahoma City, OK
Pesticide Action Network, Oakland, CA
Pululu Farm, Arroyo Seco, NM
Root ‘N Roost Farm, Livingston Manor, NY
Rooted in Community, Oakland, CA
Rural Advancement Fund, Orangeburg, SC
Rural Coalition/Coalición Rural, Washington, DC
San Diego Hunger Coalition, San Diego, CA
School Food FOCUS National Office, New York, NY
Shoreline Study Center, Encinitas, CA
Southwest Workers Union, San Antonio, TX
Taos County Economic Development Corporation, Taos, NM
Torrez Family Farm, Arroyo Seco, NM
United Farmers USA, Manning, SC
Valencia County Older American Program, Belen, NM
Virginia Association for Biological Farming, Lexington, VA
Winston County Self Help Cooperative, Jackson, MS
World Farmers, Inc., Lancaster, MA
Attachment: Equity Letter 5/13/13, Signed by 130 Organizations
This letter was prepared and circulated by the signatories who regularly participate in the “Getting Our Act Together
(GOAT) on the Farm Bill” Collaboration, which promotes a fair farm bill with equity and sustainability.

Attention: Agriculture LA

This Letter is sent on Behalf of the Undersigned Groups. For more information contact Lorette Picciano, Rural Coalition at lpicciano@ruralco.org or 202-628-7160; Katherine Ozer, National Family Farm Coalition at kozer@nffc.net or 202-543-5675 and Ferd Hoefner, National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition at fhoefner@sustainableagriculture.net, 202-547-5754.

Supporting Equity in the 2013 Farm Bill

The Honorable Debbie Stabenow, Chairwoman, Senate Agriculture Committee

The Honorable Thad Cochran, Ranking Member, Senate Agriculture Committee

The Honorable Frank Lucas, Chairman, House Agriculture Committee

The Honorable Collin Peterson, Ranking Member, House Agriculture Committee

May 13, 2013

Dear Chairs and Ranking Members,

As Congress continues its work on a new farm bill, we write to express our support for the Agriculture Committee efforts to complete a full and fair 2013 Farm Bill that will increase economic opportunity for the nation’s diverse family farmers, farmworkers, rural and urban communities and Indian Tribes; protect the environment; and ensure proper nutrition for all families and communities.

We, the undersigned organizations, all have recommendations for the farm bill that extend well beyond the specific issues in this letter, but we focus here on specific equity considerations. We support a full and fair package that balances any reductions across all areas of the Farm Bill, mitigates disasters especially for the most vulnerable producers, protects natural resources, enhances equity and inclusion, constructs a new and economically viable future for agriculture and rural communities, and assures healthy food for all consumers.

For years we have struggled to achieve a fair share of federal farm spending for all the communities we serve. Working with you in the 2002 and 2008 Farm Bills, we have made significant strides forward to allocate a small but growing portion of overall US farm and food policy to enhance equity for our nation’s diverse producers and farmworkers, secure a future in agriculture for new entry farmers and rural, urban and tribal communities, and provide fresh, local food for all consumers. Unfortunately, the farm bill extension we are currently operating under has shut down many of these very programs, setting back the modest progress achieved earlier.

We urge you to provide long-term protection and continued funding to this critical subset of small programs and offices charged with serving the most chronically underserved segments of agriculture. These represent a fraction of the full agriculture budget but are the lifeblood of a sustainable agriculture, rural development and food policy, including Indian Tribes, socially disadvantaged, beginning, and veteran producers, and farmworkers.

As you continue to shape your policy and budget proposals, we urge you to assure strong farm bill mandatory funding support at no less than $20 million a year each for the Outreach and Assistance for Socially Disadvantaged and Veteran Farmers and Ranchers Program, Beginning Farmer and Rancher Development Program, and Value-Added Producer Grants, as well as at least $4 million a year for Rural Microentrepreneur Assistance Program.

A fairer farm bill would also provide appropriate waiver, premium reduction, targeting, and advanced payment provisions for beginning, limited resource and socially disadvantaged farmers and ranchers within the farm bill conservation, credit, crop insurance, NAP, specialty crop, and rural development programs. In this light, we urge you to include all of the provisions of the Beginning Farmer and Rancher Opportunity Act and the 2013 Farm Bill Equity and Access Priorities Package in the new five-year farm bill (summaries attached; noting that a number of priorities are included in both packages).

As you proceed with your farm policy deliberations, we urge you to make all funding and policy recommendations relative to farm bill programs with an eye toward the future, a concern for the next generations of our nation’s farmers and ranchers and healthy and nutritious for food for all, and great care to being inclusive of women, minority, tribal and limited resource farmers, farmworkers and rural and urban communities who are oftentimes in most need of these important programs.

Sincerely,
African American Farmers of California, Fresno, CA
Agricultural Missions, Inc (AMI), New York, NY
Alabama State Association of Cooperatives, Forkland, AL
Alianza Nacional de Campesinas, Oxnard, CA
American Federation of Government Employees, Local 3354, St. Louis, MO
American Raw Milk Producers Pricing Association (ARMPPA), Kendall, WI
Arkansas Land and Farm Development Corporation, Brinkley, AK
Ashtabula, Geauga, Lake Counties Farmers Union, Windsor, OH
Atrisco Grant-Merced, Albuquerque, NM
BioRegional Strategies, Albuquerque, NM
California Climate and Agriculture Network, Sacramento, CA
California FarmLink, Sacramento, CA
Cape Cod Community Supported Fishery, Chatham, MA
Carolina Farm Stewardship Association, Pittsboro, NC
Cedarville Band of the Piscataway Indians, Inc., Waldorf, MD
Center for Rural Affairs, Lyons, NE
Center for Social Ecology and Public Policy, Honolulu, HI
Center for Social Inclusion, New York, NY
Center for Social Sustainable Systems (CeSoSS), Albuquerque, NM
Colorado Hispanic Ranchers & Farmers, Antonito, CO
Community Alliance for Global Justice, Seattle, WA
Community Food and Justice Coalition, Oakland, CA
Community Servings, Boston, MA
Concerned Citizens of Wagon Mound and Mora County, Wagon Mound, NM
Connections Unlimited, LLC, Yachats, OR
Cultivating Community, Portland, ME
Dakota Rural Action, Brooking, SD
Dixon Farmers Market, Dixon, NM
Dockery Group, LLC, Elm City, NC
Ecological Farming Association, Soquel, CA
Equal Exchange, West Bridgewater, MA
Family Farm Defenders, Madison, WI
Farm Aid, Cambridge, MA
Farm Fresh Rhode Island, Providence, RI
Farm to Table, Santa Fe, NM
Farms Not Arms, Petaluma, CA
Farms to Grow, Oakland, CA
Farmworker Association of Florida, Apopka, FL
Federation of Southern Cooperatives, Epes, AL
Federation of Southern Cooperatives/Land Assistance Fund, East Point, GA
Food & Water Watch, Washington, DC
Food Chain Workers Alliance, Los Angeles, CA
Food First, Oakland, CA
Foodshed Alliance, Blairstown, NJ
Franciscan Fraternity Espiritu Santo, Albuquerque, NM
Grassroots International, Boston, MA
Healthy Farms Healthy People Coalition, Washington, DC
Hispanic Organizations Leadership Alliance (HOLA), Washington, DC
Hmong National Development, Inc., Washington, DC
Hunger Action Network of New York State, New York, NY
Illinois Stewardship Alliance, Springfield, IL
Indian Country Agriculture and Resource Development Corporation (ICARD), Anadarko, OK
Indian Nations Conservation Alliance, Twin Bridges, MT
Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy, Minneapolis, MN
Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future, Baltimore, MD
Kentucky Resources Council, Inc., Frankfort, KY
La Minga Cooperative Farm, Prospect, KY
La Plazita Farm, Albuquerque, NM
La Semilla Food Center, Anthony, NM
Land Management Partners, Hilton Head Island, SC
Land Stewardship Project, Minneapolis, MN
League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC), Hereford, TX
Lideres Campesinas, Oxnard, CA
Live Real, Oakland, CA
Local Food Hub, Charlottesville, VA
Los Jardines Institute (The Gardens Institute), Albuquerque, NM
Maine Rural Partners, Orono, ME
Matthews Family Farm, Eighty-Four, PA
Michael Fields Agricultural Institute, East Troy, WI
Michigan Coalition of Black Farmers, Detroit, MI
Michigan Food & Farming Systems (MIFFS), East Lansing, MI
Mississippi Association of Cooperatives, Jackson, MS
National Council of La Raza, Washington, DC
National Family Farm Coalition, Washington, DC
National Hmong American Farmers, Inc., Fresno, CA
National Immigrant Farming Initiative, Washington, DC
National Latino Farmers and Ranchers Trade Association, Washington, DC
National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition, Washington, DC
National Women In Agriculture Association, Oklahoma City, OK
Nebraska Sustainable Agriculture Society, Ceresco, NE
New Entry Sustainable Farming Project, Lowell, MA
New Jersey SNAP-Ed , Clayton, NJ
New Mexico Acequia Association, Santa Fe, NM
New Mexico Food and Agriculture Policy Council, Santa Fe, NM
North Carolina Association of Black Lawyers Land Loss Prevention Project, Durham, NC
Northeast Organic Dairy Producers Alliance, Deerfield, MA
Northeast Organic Farming Association- Interstate Council, Stevenson, CT
Northeast Sustainable Agriculture Working Group (NESAWG), New Paltz, NY
Northern New Mexico Stockmens Association, Espanola, NM
Northwest Atlantic Marine Alliance, Gloucester, MA
Northwest Center for Alternatives to Pesticides, Eugene, OR
Northwest Farm Bill Action Group, Seattle, WA
Northwest Forest Worker Center, Albany, CA
Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association, Columbus, OH
Oklahoma Black Historical Resear ch Project Inc., Oklahoma City, OK
Operation Spring Plant, Inc., Oxford, NC
Panola Land Buyers Association Housing Development Corporation, Eutaw, AL
Pennsylvania Association for Sustainable Agriculture, Millheim, PA
Pesticide Action Network, Oakland, CA
Positive Action Now, Inc., Richmond, VA
Presbyterian Church (USA), Washington, DC
Progressive Agriculture Organization, LaFargeville, NY
Pululu Farm, Arroyo Seco, NM
Root ‘N Roost Farm, Livingston Manor, NY
Rooted In Community, Oakland, CA
Rural Advancement Foundation International-USA (RAFI-USA), Pittsboro, NC
Rural Advancement Fund, Orangeburg, SC
Rural American Network, Estancia, NM
Rural Coalition/Coalición Rural, Washington, DC
Rural Vermont, Montpelier, AL
School Food FOCUS National Office, New York, NY
Shoreline Study Center, Carlsbad, CA
Silas H Hunt CDC, Texarkana, AR
Slow Food USA, Brooklyn, NY
Sofi’s Rock Farm, Halifax, MA
South Valley Economic Development Center, Atrisco, NM
South Valley Regional Association of Acequias (SVRAA), Albuquerque, NM
Southern Sustainable Agriculture Working Group (SAWG), Fayetteville, AR
Sustainable Farming Association, Princeton, MN
Taos County Economic Development Corporation, Taos, NM
The Border Agricultural Workers Project, El Paso , TX
The Cornucopia Institute, Cornucopia, WI
The Eye of Heru Study Group, Detroit, MI
The Second Chance Foundation, New York, NY
Tilth Producers of Washington, Seattle, WA
Torrez Farm, Arroyo Seco, NM

This letter was prepared and circulated by the signatories who regularly participate in the “Getting Our Act Together (GOAT) on the Farm Bill” Collaboration, which promotes a fair farm bill with equity and sustainability.

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